The Tale of Reddy Woodpecker, Arthur Scott Bailey
The Tale of Reddy Woodpecker
Arthur Scott Bailey
1:40 h Children Lvl 2.23
Arthur Scott Bailey (November 16, 1877 – October 17, 1949) was an American writer. He was the author of more than forty children's books. The Tale of Reddy Woodpecker, a story from Tuck-Me-In Tales, was published in 1922. If you had been in Farmer Green’s door-yard on a certain day in May you would have heard an unusual twittering and chirping and squawking. Now, there was a reason for all this chatter. Jolly Robin’s wife had seen a handsome stranger in the orchard. And she had hurried away to spread the news among her friends.

The Tale of Reddy Woodpecker

by
Arthur Scott Bailey


I
Mrs. Robin's News

If you had been in Farmer Green’s door-yard on a certain day in May you would have heard an unusual twittering and chirping and squawking.

Now, there was a reason for all this chatter. Jolly Robin’s wife had seen a handsome stranger in the orchard. And she had hurried away to spread the news among her friends.

“He’s a dashing person, very elegantly dressed,” Mrs. Robin told everybody.

That remark did not seem to please the good lady’s husband. For Jolly Robin turned up his nose — or his bill — slightly, and he said to his wife, “The question is: What are his manners like?”

Mrs. Robin admitted that the stranger’s manners were not all that one might wish.

“He was somewhat noisy,” she explained. “And I fear he may be quarrelsome. But his clothes certainly were beautiful.”

Jasper Jay, who was something of a dandy, wanted to know exactly what the stranger wore. He said he doubted that the newcomer was as fashionable as Mrs. Robin supposed.

“I can’t tell you much about his suit,” Mrs. Robin went on, “except that it was new and stylish. What I noticed specially was his cap. It was a big one and it was a brilliant red.”

Jasper Jay sniffed when he heard that.

“They’re not wearing red caps this season,” he declared. He flew off then, to find his cousin Mr. Crow and tell him the news. For he hoped that Mr. Crow would give the stranger a disagreeable greeting. Jasper Jay did not like other birds to be more gayly dressed than he.

While all the feathered folk in the neighborhood were wondering who the stranger could be old Mr. Crow came winging over from the edge of the woods.

“Where is he?” he squalled. “Let me have one look at this new arrival! I think I know who he is.”

A little later Mr. Crow had his look, over in the orchard. Then he came back and alighted in the tall grass behind the farmhouse.

“He’s a Red-headed Woodpecker,” Mr. Crow announced with a wise tilt of his own head. “There hasn’t been one of his kind in Pleasant Valley for years and years…. It’s a pity,” he added, “that this one has stopped here.”

The old gentleman’s words threw little Mrs. Chippy into a flutter.

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