Sky Island
L. Frank Baum
Children
6:32 h
Level 6
Sky Island: Being the Further Adventures of Trot and Cap'n Bill after Their Visit to the Sea Fairies is a children's fantasy novel written by L. Frank Baum, illustrated by John R. Neill, and published in 1912 by the Reilly & Britton Company —the same constellation of forces that produced the Oz books in the first decades of the twentieth century. As the full title indicates, Sky Island is a sequel to Baum's The Sea Fairies of 1911. Trot, a little girl who lives on the coast of southern California, meets a strange little boy with a large umbrella. Button Bright has been using his family's magic umbrella to take long-range journeys from his Philadelphia home, and has gotten as far as California. After an explanation of how the magic umbrella works, the two children, joined by Cap'n Bill, decide to take a trip to a nearby island; they call it "Sky island," because it looks like it's "halfway in the sky"—but the umbrella takes them to a different place entirely, a literal island in the sky.

Sky Island

by
L. Frank Baum

Illustrated by John R. Neill


A Little Talk to My Readers

With “The Sea Fairies,” my book for 1911, I ventured into a new field of fairy literature and to my delight the book was received with much approval by my former readers, many of whom have written me that they like Trot “almost as well as Dorothy.” As Dorothy was an old, old friend and Trot a new one, I think this is very high praise for Cap’n Bill’s little companion. Cap’n Bill is also a new character who seems to have won approval, and so both Trot and the old sailor are again introduced in the present story, which may be called the second of the series of adventures of Trot and Cap’n Bill.

But you will recognize some other acquaintances in “Sky Island.” Here, for instance, is Button-Bright, who once had an adventure with Dorothy in Oz, and without Button-Bright and his Magic Umbrella you will see that the story of “Sky Island” could never have been written. As Polychrome, the Rainbow’s Daughter, lives in the sky, it is natural that Trot and Button-Bright meet her during their adventures there.

This story of Sky Island has astonished me considerably, and I think it will also astonish you. The sky country is certainly a remarkable fairyland, but after reading about it I am sure you will agree with me that our old Mother Earth is a very good place to live upon and that Trot and Button-Bright and Cap’n Bill were fortunate to get back to it again.

By the way, one of my little correspondents has suggested that I print my address in this book, so that the children may know where letters will reach me. I am doing this, as you see, and hope that many will write to me and tell me how they like “Sky Island.” My greatest treasures are these letters from my readers and I am always delighted to receive them.

L. FRANK BAUM.

“OZCOT”
at HOLLYWOOD
in CALIFORNIA


Chapter I.
A Mysterious Arrival

“HELLO,” said the boy.

“Hello,” answered Trot, looking up surprised. “Where did you come from?”

“Philadelphia,” said he.

“Dear me,” said Trot; “you’re a long way from home, then.”

“’Bout as far as I can get, in this country,” the boy replied, gazing out over the water. “Isn’t this the Pacific Ocean?”