The Rover Boys on a Tour
Arthur M. Winfield
Children
8:02 h
Level 3
The Rover Boys was a popular juvenile series written by Arthur M. Winfield, a pseudonym for Edward Stratemeyer. Thirty titles were published between 1899 and 1926 and the books remained in print for years afterward. The Rover Boys on a Tour, or Last Days at Brill College was published in 1916. The Rovers were students at a military boarding school: adventurous, prank-playing, flirtatious, and often unchaperoned adolescents who were frequently causing mischief for authorities, as well as for criminals. The series often incorporated modern technology of the era, such as the automobile, airplanes and news events, such as World War I.

The Rover Boys on a Tour

Or

Last Days at Brill College

by
Arthur M. Winfield
(Edward Stratemeyer)


THE ARRIVAL AT THE BARLOW FARMHOUSE.

Introduction

My Dear Boys: This book is a complete story in itself, but forms the twentieth volume in a line issued under the general title, “The Rover Boys Series for Young Americans.”

As I have mentioned in other volumes, this line was started a number of years ago with the publication of “The Rover Boys at School,” “On the Ocean,” and “In the Jungle.” These stories were so well received that there was an immediate cry for more, and so, year by year, they were followed by the publication of “The Rover Boys Out West,” “On the Great Lakes,” “In the Mountains,” “In Camp,” “On Land and Sea,” “On the River,” “On the Plains,” “In Southern Waters,” “On the Farm,” “On Treasure Isle,” “At College,” “Down East,” “In the Air,” “In New York,” “In Alaska,” and finally, “In Business,” where we last left our heroes.

The Rover boys have, of course, gradually been growing older. Dick and Tom are both married and doing what they can to carry on their father’s business in New York City. Sam, the youngest of the boys, is still at Brill College. The particulars are given of some winter sports around that institution of learning, and then of a great baseball game in which the youngest Rover distinguishes himself. Then Sam graduates from college, and all the boys, with some others, go on a long automobile tour, during which a number of exciting adventures occur. The party is caught in a storm on the mountains, and later on are caught in a great flood. What the Rover boys did under such trying circumstances I leave for the pages which follow to disclose.

Once more I wish to thank all my young friends for the many gratifying things they have said about my books. I trust that the present volume will fulfil all their expectations, and that the reading of the same will do them good.

Affectionately and sincerely yours,

Edward Stratemeyer


Chapter I

The Snowball Fight

“Now then, boys, are you ready?”

“I am!”

“Been ready for the last five minutes!”

“Sure you’ve got all the snowballs you can carry?”