The Rover Boys in the Jungle
Arthur M. Winfield
Children
5:15 h
Level 3
The Rover Boys was a popular juvenile series written by Arthur M. Winfield, a pseudonym for Edward Stratemeyer. Thirty titles were published between 1899 and 1926 and the books remained in print for years afterward. The Rover Boys in the Jungle, Or, Stirring Adventures in Africa, is the third book in series and it was published in 1899. The Rovers were students at a military boarding school: adventurous, prank-playing, flirtatious, and often unchaperoned adolescents who were frequently causing mischief for authorities, as well as for criminals. The series often incorporated modern technology of the era, such as the automobile, airplanes and news events, such as World War

The Rover Boys in the Jungle

Or, Stirring Adventures in Africa

by
Arthur M. Winfield


Introduction

My dear boys:

This volume, “The Rover Boys in the jungle,” is the third story ofthe “Rover Boys Series,” and while a complete tale in itself,forms a companion story to “The Rover Boys at School” and “TheRover Boys on the Ocean,” which preceded it.

In the former volumes I told you much of the doings of Dick, Tom,and Sam at Putnam Hall and during a remarkable chase on theAtlantic Ocean. In the present story the scene is shifted fromthe military academy, where the boys are cadets, to the wilds ofAfrica, whither the lads with their uncle have gone to look forAnderson Rover, the boys’ father, who had disappeared many yearsbefore. A remarkable message from the sea causes the party toleave this country, and they journey to Africa, little dreaming ofall the stirring adventures which await them in the heart of theDark Continent. How they battle against their many perils, andwhat the outcome of their remarkable search is, I will leave forthe pages that follow to explain.

In conclusion, let me state that I am extremely grateful for thekind favor given the previous volumes of this series, and Isincerely trust that the present tale merits a continuance of yoursupport.

Affectionately and sincerely yours,

EDWARD STRATEMEYER
November 10, 1899


Chapter I
Unpleasant News

“Back to Putnam Hall again, boys! Hurrah!”

“Yes, back again, Tom, and glad of it,” returned Dick Rover. “Ican tell you, the academy is getting to be a regular second home.”

“Right you are, Dick,” came from Sam Rover, the youngest of thethree brothers. “I’d rather be here than up to the farm, even ifUncle Randolph and Aunt Martha are kind and considerate. The farmis so slow — ”

“While here we have our full share of adventures and more,”finished Tom. “I wonder what will happen to us this term? Theother terms kept us mighty busy, didn’t they?”

“I’m not looking for any more outside adventures,” said Dick, witha serious shake of his head. “Our enemies have been disposed of,and I don’t want to hear of or see them again.”

“Nor I — but we’ll hear of them, nevertheless, mark my words.The Baxters won’t leave us rest. They are a hard crowd, and BuddyGirk is just as bad,” finished Tom.