The Rover Boys at College
Arthur M. Winfield
Children
6:33 h
Level 3
The Rover Boys was a popular juvenile series written by Arthur M. Winfield, a pseudonym for Edward Stratemeyer. Thirty titles were published between 1899 and 1926 and the books remained in print for years afterward. The Rover Boys at College, or, The Right Roads and the Wrong was published in 1910. The Rovers were students at a military boarding school: adventurous, prank-playing, flirtatious, and often unchaperoned adolescents who were frequently causing mischief for authorities, as well as for criminals. The series often incorporated modern technology of the era, such as the automobile, airplanes and news events, such as World War I.

The Rover Boys at College

or

The Right Road and the Wrong

by
Arthur M. Winfield


Chapter I

On the Train

“We’re making time now, Tom.”

“Making time?” repeated Tom Rover as he gazed out of the car window atthe telegraph poles flashing past. “I should say we were, Sam! Why, wemust be running sixty miles an hour!”

“If we are not we are making pretty close to it,” came from a thirdboy of the party in the parlor car. “I think the engineer is trying tomake up some of the time we lost at the last stop.”

“That must be it, Dick,” said Sam Rover. “Gracious, how we arerocking!” he added as the train rushed around a sharp curve and nearlythrew him from his chair.

“I hope we get to Ashton on time,” remarked Tom Rover. “I want to takea look around the grounds before it gets dark.”

“That’s Tom, wanting to see it all before he sleeps!” cried Sam Roverwith a grin. “You look out, Tom, that you don’t get into disgrace thefirst thing, as you did when we went to Putnam Hall Don’t you rememberthat giant firecracker, and how Josiah Crabtree locked you up in acell for setting it off?”

“Ugh! Will I ever forget it!” groaned Tom, making a wry face. “ButI got the best of old Crabtree, didn’t I?” he continued, his facebrightening.

“Wonder if we’ll make as many friends at college as we did at Putnam Hall,” remarked Dick Rover. “Those were jolly times and no mistake! Think of the feasts, and the hazings, and the baseball and football, and the rackets with the Pornell students, and all that!”

“Speaking of hazing, I heard that some of the hazing at the collegewe’re bound for is fierce,” came from Sam Rover.

“Well, we’ll have to stand for what comes, Sam,” answered his bigbrother. “No crying quit’ here.”

“Right you are, Dick,” said Tom, “At the same time if — Great Caesar’sghost, what’s up now!”

As Tom uttered the last words a shrill whistle from the locomotivepierced the air. Then came the sudden gripping of the air brakes onthe car wheels, and the express came to a stop with a shock thatpitched all the passengers from their seats. Tom and Sam wentsprawling in a heap in the aisle and Dick came down on top of them.